10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

Most people believe that the history of the United States began in 1776, but this assumption is far from the truth. In fact, North American history goes back thousands of years. Who inhabited the territory of the United States long ago? What have these people left behind? This article presents some of the most interesting and mysterious archaeological finds ever discovered in the United States.

1. Mysterious Stone, discovered not far from Lake Winnipesaukee1In 1872, close to Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire, archaeologists discovered a mysterious, smooth, dark-colored stone that looked like an egg. Its height was about 10 centimeters, and width - 6.4 centimeters. Strange characters were carved on the surface of the stone, as well as images of the face, corncobs and wigwam. Archaeologists are extremely interested in the origin of the stone. What was it made by? For what purpose? According to one theory, the stone may have been created by Native Americans to commemorate the signing of a peace treaty between the two tribes.Supporters of other versions believe that the stone is of Celtic or Inuit origin. The puzzle became more complicated when the researchers studied two holes in the stone: one at the top and the other at the bottom. They were made with incredible precision, which pre-modern instruments were hardly capable of. This led scientists to believe that a stone could be an elaborate fake. And some people are completely convinced that it was created by supernatural forces.

2. Petroglyphs discovered in an Indian cave2In the 19th century, a small cave was found in Harrison County (West Virginia), with intricate prehistoric petroglyphs painted on its walls. They depicted a series of animals, including rattlesnakes and fish. The Indian cave is incredibly well preserved; according to archaeologists, time spared her and left her "virtually unchanged."

The curious petroglyphs found on the cave walls are unique because they were created using red. He is present on a number of images. Archaeologists have found that the petroglyphs were left by the early Native Americans, but they cannot determine which particular people they belonged to.The remains of pottery found in the cave indicate that they lived in it between the years 500 and 1675. As for the petroglyphs, the purpose of their creation remains a mystery to scientists.

3. American Stonehenge3Outside of Salem (New Hampshire) are the ruins of what, according to some scholars, was once an ancient settlement. Today this place is known as American Stonehenge. Here you can find numerous man-made dolmens, walls and other stone structures.

American Stonehenge has generated between historians and archaeologists a lot of controversy associated with its origin and purpose. According to the most common theory, it was built by Native Americans about 2,500 years ago and has been used for centuries as a venue for religious ceremonies. Proponents of another less popular theory claim that the stone structures discovered were created by Irish monks around 1000 AD.

4. Power Point Mounds4In the state of Louisiana is a complex of ancient mounds, which today is known as Power Point. It was created by Native Americans between 1700 and 1100 BC.What makes Powerty Point unique is that it is the only known example of large complexes left by a society of hunter-gatherers. No one knows exactly what purpose Power Point served. According to some archaeologists, it was used as a venue for various ceremonies and ceremonial events. However, other scientists argue that Power Point was a permanent settlement. Again, we do not know what kind of culture built it, because it is impossible to judge anything by the number of artifacts found by archaeologists.

5. Upton dolmen5Hundreds of mysterious dolmens and stone buildings are scattered throughout New England. There are many assumptions about who created these structures. Some believe that they were Native Americans, others - the early settlers, and others - the Scandinavians or Irish monks. One of the most impressive man-made dolmens is located in Upton, Massachusetts. Upton dolmen is built on a hill; it has a long corridor that leads to the domed room. Upton dolmen indicates that those who created it, had fundamental knowledge in the field of astronomy and masonry.On the day of the summer solstice, the rays of the sun fall directly at the entrance to the dolmen, thanks to which the inner dome becomes perfectly lit. In this regard, some scientists believe that the Upton dolmen was not built by settlers, but by ancient people. Among archaeologists there are also those who attribute the construction of a dolmen to Irish monks. In their opinion, the dolmen bears a striking resemblance to the structures found in Ireland around the 8th century AD.

6. Serpent Mound (Serpent Mound)6Serpent Mound is an ancient mound discovered in the state of Ohio. He is a mound in the form of a huge snake. Archaeologists could not figure out when, who and for what purpose built it. The results of radiocarbon analysis showed that the mound was most likely created in 1000 AD. However, other researchers suggest that it is over 2,000 years old.

There are a number of theories about the purposes for which the mound was used. According to some archaeologists, it served as a venue for religious ceremonies and, perhaps, even sacrifices. Other scientists believe that the mound was used as an astronomical calendar.

7Petroglyphs of Winnemucca Lake7Not far from the dried-up Lake Winnemkka in Nevada, archaeologists have discovered that, in their opinion, is the oldest petroglyphs in North America. They were left on several huge boulders. On some of them, images of a round shape prevail, on the others - diamond-like. These petroglyphs are unique for two reasons. First, there are not so many of them, compared to other petroglyphs found throughout the country. Secondly, they are at least 10 thousand years old. There are still many questions about the origin and purpose of the petroglyphs of Lake Winnemkka. They, undoubtedly, were created by the early Native Americans, but to which particular people they belonged, scientists do not know.

8. Cahokia8Cahokia was the largest city in pre-Columbian North America, in which about 15 thousand people lived. It was founded in the midst of the fertile Mississippi Valley, where St. Louis is now located. Cahokia ran from about 700 to about 1300 AD. Apparently, it was a complex urban society with a ruling class and a unique culture.Its inhabitants engaged in farming, fought with other tribes and, apparently, practiced the rites of sacrifice. And then they disappeared without a trace. Historians have long been hotly debated about what happened to them, but still have not come to a common opinion. According to one theory, deforestation, climate change, disease, and fear of invasion could be the causes of Cahokia’s decline.

9. Coin found in Maine9During the excavation of a Native American settlement in Maine in 1957, archaeologists discovered a small coin of unknown origin. At first, scientists thought it was a 12th century British penny. However, a year later, they conducted a thorough analysis of the findings and found that the coin was of Scandinavian origin. Experts from the University of Oslo said that the coin was most likely released between 1065 and 1080. It is the only pre-Columbian Scandinavian artifact found in the United States. But how could an ancient coin end up on the coast of Maine? Some scientists believe that it is evidence of the existence of contact between the early Scandinavian settlements in Newfoundland and the Native Americans.

10. Dayton Rock10Dayton Rock is a forty-ton stone that was found in the Taunton River (Berkeley, Massachusetts) in 1690. It is known for its mysterious, unique petroglyphs. For many years, scientists have been trying to find the answer to the question of who could create mysterious inscriptions on Daytona Roque. According to one popular theory, petroglyphs are of Scandinavian origin. However, some archaeologists believe that they were abandoned by Native Americans, because in the area where Dayton Rock was discovered, many Indians once lived.

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  • 10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States

    10 mysterious archaeological finds in the United States