Battle on Cable Street

Battle on Cable Street.

6795614_originalIn the 1930s, the British Fascist Union (BSF) was organized in Britain. It was founded by a British politician, the Baronet, Sir Oswald Mosley. By the summer of 1934, BSF had dozens of offices throughout the UK and abroad - in Italy and Germany. Fascist organizations of women, youth, the Fascist Union of British Workers, the Federation of British University Fascist Associations with representative offices in Oxford and Cambridge, etc. were created. He had his own self-defense forces - assault detachments, transport sections were formed ), a first aid service and a blood transfusion section have been created. The organization consisted of about 50,000 people.

During Mosley’s speeches, BSF members pointedly beat those who tried to chant anti-fascist slogans or ask questions. The Daily Telegraph wrote: “Every time someone got up and said or tried to say a few words that only his nearest neighbors could hear, ten or fifteen fascists would immediately attack him, mercilessly beat and throw him out of the hall.”"Manchester Guardian": "... Searchlights were sent to interrupt, probably in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods used by the Nazis ..."

The citizens themselves stopped the fascists in Britain. In 1936, Mosley decided to march with anti-Semitic slogans across the East End - one of the poorest districts of London, in which many Jews lived. The march was coordinated with the authorities and the convoy was accompanied by about 10,000 police officers (including 4,000 mounted police officers). To counter the march, up to three hundred thousand local residents, including Jewish and Irish groups, as well as activists of leftist organizations (socialists, communists, Trotskyists, anarchists) took to the streets. Several barricades were erected on the streets. The police tried to break through. Demonstrators shouting "No pasaran!" Fought them back, using sticks, stones, legs of chairs, and other improvised weapons. The women threw trash, rotten vegetables and the contents of the night pots into the police. The horses slid and fell — small children threw their glass marbles under their hoofs. A column of black-shirts attempted to bypass the barricade, but the inhabitants immediately constructed a new one.After three hours of clashes, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Philip Geim banned the march of the Black Shirts and urged members of the Mosley Union to disperse. Marsh went down in history as the Battle of Cable Street.

The British Fascist Union began to quickly lose its members. Its representatives took part in the elections, but could not win in any electoral district. During one of the meetings of the Union of Fascists, at which Mosley spoke, the outraged assembled almost hung up the leader of the British fascists.

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  • Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street

    Battle on Cable Street