Haka Maori fighting dance

Haka Maori fighting dance


Emerald, perfectly trimmed lawn. Two groups of men stand opposite each other: strong and muscular, incredibly strong even in appearance, dressed in sportswear. The players of the New Zealand national rugby team are dressed in all black: the only bright spot is the silver leaf of the fern on the chest of each athlete.
It does not matter what their opponents wear. It does not matter at all who entered the field against the New Zealand All Blacks. Maori descendants will sing and dance an awesome war song to any rival. This article focuses on the ancient tradition of the aborigines of New Zealand popularized in our days - hack.
This is a short version. Sometimes they dance for three minutes.
First I want to talk a little about Maori. But not about those that inhabit the “Land of the Long White Cloud” today, but about their warlike ancestors. According to legend, a thousand years ago, seven canoes landed on the shores of New Zealand, on board of which were settlers from Eastern Polynesia. It was they who became the first inhabitants of the island - seven Maori tribes, thanks to which a unique culture based on the spiritual closeness of the Aboriginal people with the outside world began to form.But, despite the philosophy of unity with nature, the Maori were very skilled fighters, and their skills were perfected in constant wars. The first Europeans to experience the wild hostile disposition of the Aborigines were great travelers: Abel Tasman, and later James Cook.
The bloody feuds of Maori have long since passed into oblivion, but one of the military customs has not been forgotten and plays a very important role in the modern culture of New Zealand. Kapa haka is a whole ritual that includes dancing, singing, a kind of facial expression. For the first time, the haku began to be performed by Maori warriors hundreds of years ago: before each battle, they tried to intimidate the enemy with their fierce expression using awesome gestures and shouts, eyes bulging and tongues stuck out Later, haku was used for peaceful purposes, telling through it about Maori traditions and beliefs. Today, hack is an indispensable attribute of public and state events.
There are many different versions of traditional dance in New Zealand, there is even an army performance. But, generally speaking, Kapa haka is not only a male dance, accompanied by unfriendly cries. There is also a female direction of the ancient custom, which is called “poi”.This is also a dance, combined with juggling balls on the ropes. Women's haka, of course, more relaxed than men. Despite the fact that any kind of khaki in New Zealand is respected and revered, popular throughout the world ritual singing accompanied by intricate movements was precisely because of the national rugby team.
Officially, the New Zealand rugby team appeared in 1892. And in 1905, the newspaper “Daily mail”, after the New Zealanders defeated the English club, nicknamed the All Blacks team, which can be translated as “absolutely black”. So, thanks to its dark form and newspaper people, the national team of Aotearoa - the country of a long white cloud - gained a resounding nickname, which became with the hack, which the players played before each match, their business card.
About a century since the founding of the team, the New Zealand national team was the best in the world, beating everyone and everything. But by the beginning of the twenty-first century, the descendants of Maori had somewhat slowed down: in recent years, trophies have eluded All Blacks with enviable regularity. Maybe the whole thing is that the opponents are accustomed to the hack and are no longer afraid? The answer is rather negative.for the current performance of the dance is rather a means for the New Zealanders to mentally gather and tune in, forgetting everything that does not concern the game than the means for intimidating the enemies.
authentic version
Talking about how Māori dance haku is meaningless. This is a must see: for example, here. But the fact that the players shout out is necessary to say.
Initially, the All Blacks performed the haka "Ka Mate", or rather its part, which tells about the miraculous salvation of a warrior from enemies, which happened due to the Sun. I will give two key, in my opinion, excerpts from this khaki:
Ka mate, ka mate! ka ora! ka ora!
Whiti te ra!
This is death, this is death! (or: I'll die) This is life! That's life! (or: I will live)
The sun is shining!
First, Maori, resigned to a bitter fate, is preparing to adequately meet their doom, but after a moment, happily realizes that he will survive and shouts out thanks to the god of the Sun.
In addition to this, the leader of Rauparahi, invented hundreds of years ago, the All Blacks adopted a new Kapa o-Pango (“completely black” in translation), created specifically for them, for the New Zealand national rugby team. It does not speak about the past exploits of the Maori, but about the modern ones: the desire of athletes to win victories, defending the honor of the country.The fact that the new Zealanders are going to do with the enemy, speaks eloquently one of the gestures of the new khaki: palm movement, cutting the throat.
Pre-match performance of khaki by New Zealand players has become an integral part of world rugby. Militant dances became the property of the world sports culture. Some teams, such as Fiji or Samoa, perform All Blacks in response to their dances. And who knows, maybe in the future fashionable trend today will become an indispensable attribute of any sporting events. In any case, the descendants of Maori in every possible way contribute to this by participating in advertising campaigns and popularizing rugby.
© tyreno
And a few more kamentov
Ringa pakia
(beat with palms on thighs)
Uma tirah
(exhale deeply)
Turi uatia
(bend your knees)
Hope uai ake
(let thighs follow)
Wowae takaya kia cinema
(lean stronger on the ground)
Ka mate! Ka mate!
(This is death! This is death!)
Ka ora! Ka ora!
(This is life! This is life!)
Tenei Te Tangata Puhuruhuru
(Hairy man walking)
Nana and Tiki Mai Uauwahiti Ter
(The one who made the sun shine again)
Upane upane
(Up the stairs, Up the stairs)
Upane kaupane
(To the very top)
Whithi tera
(The sun is shining)
- Nickname of the national team of New Zealand - All Blacks ("Completely black"). In 1905, when this team smashed the English club Hartlepool 63–0, the Daily Mail invented this nickname because of the dark form of the guests of “Haka” - the traditional Maori dance, it reflects the passion and national identity of this people. They DO NOT IMAGE it, but really and seriously count on real intimidation and defeat of the enemy (the same was meant by the warriors three hundred years ago).
In a team, haku always begins - only the Maoritian warrior. In 1883, the New Zealand rugby team, consisting mainly of Maori (of the whole team, only four were white natives of New Zealand) first performed the hack before the match in the UK - as it should be - in military decoration and with a weapon, in a “loincloth” . It was also a real hack, though not a Ka Mate. By the way, in one of these ancient matches, the hacked Irish responded with loud singing of their national anthem, to raise their Irish spirit ...
The haka is a sacred dance, and the All Blacks have always performed the Ka Mate with the permission of the Ngati Toa tribe.Strictly speaking, what All Blacks perform under the name of Ka Mate is not a historical classic in its purest form. This is a short version of the khaki that the leader of Rauparah first performed, while preserving the main links of its structure, namely, in my understanding, thanksgiving dance to the Sun (whiti te ra!) For the joy of accidental survival and victory (ka mate! I will die ... and suddenly, joyfully - Ka ora! I will live!).
when the Polynesian teams meet, the hack is executed by both parties

A few years ago, the All Blacks took a new hack - not in exchange for the famous KA MATE, but in addition. It is called Kapa o Pango (in translation - All Blacks - Completely black), and it is the real thing, in accordance with all traditions. I am personally impressed.
All Blacks Kapa o-Pango is a real thing that was created specifically for the team, for the game, to meet the ambitions of young players, to highlight the profile of the team itself. This hack says (shouts out) about a traditional black T-shirt with a branch of a silver fern, about the desire of a young warrior to win and protect the honor of his tribe (country) and at the same time devour the enemy ...
here it is very cool happened.And it happens even when they step closer to the lineof enemiesrivals and screaming them right in the face and waving their hands in front of their nose.
This hack is based on a very ancient hack, Ruaumoko (Ruamoko) - this was the name of the unborn young son of Mother Earth (Te Papa) and Father-Heaven (Te Rangi), who constantly breaks out and shakes Mother Earth. Therefore, many believe that the new hack has a much stronger means of expression and intimidation than Ka Mate. This new hack caused great disagreements in a politically correct society — the initiator khaki and all the players deliberately demonstrate a movement imitating the cutting of the throat (of course, not for myself, but for the enemy). Haku First of all, this is part of the established dance ritual, which also includes an eerie roll of eyes. If both men and women roll their eyes, then only the men stick out the tongue almost to the navel (this grimace is called fetero - whetero). Of course, there is one clear interpretation of this grimace - it initially developed in a hack as a sign of contempt for the enemy. By the way, women also take part in the hack. Their task is to support the warriors. Not so scary, but threatening enough. There is also a special female hack.
and even it happens
In general, if the box shows rugby with New Zealand, be sure to look at least the beginning - this is very impressive.

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  • Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance

    Haka Maori fighting dance