Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

Every year, people make millions, and possibly billions of photos, but very few are exceptional. The Pulitzer Prize - the most famous award awarded in the field of photojournalism - is given to photographs that are truly outstanding. The award has been awarded annually since 1942.

Warning: Some photos may cause unpleasant feelings.

Help of the holy father1

This photo, titled “Help of the Holy Father,” taken by photographer Hector Rondon Lovera, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1963. In the photo, the priest keeps a soldier dying from a sniper's bullet in order to absolve him of his sins before dying. It was made on June 4, 1962, during a mutiny in Venezuela, when insurgents tried to seize the city of Puerto Cabello. The priest depicted in the photograph is a naval chaplain named Louise Padilio.

All actions padre were clearly visible from the opposite side of the street. No one dared to shoot at him, because everyone understood that his death would be very likely to be used for propaganda. In addition, the enemy soldiers were Catholics and would hardly have agreed to kill the priest, even by order.

Even more interesting photo makes the background. The action takes place against the background of the store with the sign "La Carneceria", which means "butcher shop", or "massacre", "slaughter". The military rebellion lasted only 4 days (from 2 to 6 June 1962), for which 700 people were killed and injured.

Execution in Liberia2

In 1981, Larry Price won the Pulitzer Prize for photography, taken during the 1980 Liberian coup. The plot was conceived and brought to life by 18 non-commissioned officers of the Liberian Army, led by senior sergeant Samuel Doe. Liberian President William Tolbert Jr., with 28 of his followers, died in the coup.

Thirteen of his ministers accused of corruption, betrayal and violation of human rights were presented to a hasty court in which they were forbidden to have lawyers. Four of the thirteen ministers were convicted and sentenced to death, but the court’s decision was overturned by the Redemptive Council, headed by Dow himself, who announcedthat all 13 were guilty and must be executed. All thirteen ministers were stripped naked and forced to walk along the streets of Monrovia in this form, before being taken to the seashore, where they were tied to posts to execute the sentence.

But there were only 9 pillars at the place of execution. Nine ministers were tied to posts and executed, the other four were forced to observe the executions. One of the ministers, Cecil Dennis, met death courageously, looking his assassin straight in the eye. He died last, having survived the first stage of execution. He was executed by two soldiers who shot him alternately with a machine gun and a pistol in turn at a very close distance.

Fire at Seton Hall University3

Matt Rainey won the Pulitzer Prize for a series of photographs of his roommates: Shawn Simons and Alvaro Llanos, who were injured during a fire at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. The photos were taken at St. Barnabas Medical Center in Livingstone, New Jersey, where the children were undergoing rehabilitation.

A fire broke out in Seton Hall, killing three students and injuring 58.The fire was caused by two students who decided to joke unsuccessfully. They set a fire in the lobby of the Boland hostel, which was known to be frequent false fire alarms, at 4.30 in the morning. Initially, all students ignored the fire alarm, thinking that this was another false alarm. They began evacuation only when the fire became apparent and irreversible.

One of the students jumped from the third floor, and two others reported that they had seen another one burned alive. As a result, two students were burned alive, and one choked. Two firefighters, three police officers and 50 students were injured, five of which were badly burned.

Shooting at Kent State University4

Photographer John Paul Filo won the Pulitzer Prize for the Best News Photography nomination in 1971 for a series of shots he took during events at Kent State University on May 4, 1970. The photograph, for which the prize was awarded, depicts a woman named Mary Ann Vecchio, kneeling next to Jeffrey Miller's lifeless body.

On April 30, 1970, President Richard Nixon announced on national television that more than 150,000 soldiers should be sent to Vietnam for the ongoing war.He also added that the United States intends to invade Cambodia. The students reacted very hostilely to the call of the President: throughout the country, they set fire to officer training centers.

Protests spread to Kent State University, Ohio, where the governor of the state, James Rhodes, announced that students are the worst people in the United States. He banned all protests in the state, but the students ignored the order. Soon there were soldiers of the National Guard. They threw tear gas at the students, and when it did not help, the soldiers opened fire. By the time the shooting ended, four students were killed and 10 were injured. An investigation was launched into these killings, and eight guardsmen were charged. However, later all the charges were dropped due to "lack of evidence."

Bombing US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania5

In 1999, the Pulitzer Prize in the nomination “News Photography” was awarded to photographers from the Associated Press for a series of photographs taken after the bombings of the American embassies in Tanzania and Kenya. On August 7, 1998, two bombs exploded on the territory of two different embassies: the first in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and the second in Nairobi, Kenya.The explosions killed 224 people and injured more than 4,500 people. The incidents, which would later be known as the East African bombings, forced the FBI to send 900 of their agents to the affected areas. It was later proved that the explosions were organized by al-Qaeda.

An explosion at the embassy of Nairobi, which was so loud that it was heard within a radius of 16 kilometers, destroyed the five-story building next door. The consulate itself was severely damaged; its blast doors were ripped apart. In Tanzania, one of the survivors said that the explosion threw him back 1.5 meters.

Fire escape6

In 1976, Stanley Forman won the Pulitzer Prize for photographs taken in 1975, depicting 19-year-old Diane Bryan and her two-year-old godchild, Tiara Jones, falling from a fire escape that struck during a fire at their home in Boston, Massachusetts. July 22, 1975, when Stanley was going to go home from work at the Boston Herald, he received a call that a fire had occurred in his house. He hurried to the scene, walked to the back of the house, where he saw Diana and Tiara standing on the fire escape. Soon they were joined by fireman Bob O'Neill.A ladder from the fire truck was pushed towards them, but as soon as Bob climbed down the stairs, she collapsed.

While Bob grabbed the ladder with one hand, Diana and Tiara fell to the ground from a height of about 15 meters. Diana received severe injuries from a fall, and died from her wounds on the same day. Tiara survived because she fell on Diana.

Stanley's photographs were widely replicated, and this forced Boston officials to rewrite the laws on fire safety, and more specifically on fire escapes.

Judicial Case of Elian Gonzalez7

In 2001, Alan Diaz of the Associated Press won the Pulitzer Prize for his photograph, where federal agents armed with machine guns took the young boy, Eliana González, from his relatives in a house in Miami, Florida. This story began in 1999, when six-year-old Elian was on a boat that sailed from Cuba to the United States. The boat sank, the mother of Eliana and nine others died. After Elian was rescued, he was transferred to his relatives living in Miami. However, his father, Juan Miguel, wanted to return him to Cuba. The difficulty was that the United States was at odds with Cuba. Fidel Castro even organized several protest actions demanding the return of Elian to Cuba.Meanwhile, Elian’s relatives in Miami did not want to return him.

After several months of lawsuits and protests in both Cuba and Miami, it was decided to return Elian to his father, who was already waiting for him in the United States, to fly back to Cuba. His relatives in Miami were ordered to hand him over to the Department of Justice, but they refused, forcing Attorney General Janet Reno to organize the seizure of their house early in the morning in order to take the boy by force. Then Elian was sent to Washington, DC, where he was handed over to his father, who took him back to Cuba.

Sinking of Andrea Doria8

Photographer Harry A. Trask won the Pulitzer Prize for photographs of the sinking ocean liner Andrea Doria, taken in 1957 from the aircraft nine minutes before the ship was completely submerged. The Italian ship was the last large transatlantic ship to sink, now the preferred method for crossing the Atlantic became aircraft. When Andrea Doria was built, he was declared the largest, fastest, and safest ship in Italy.

"Andrea Doria" was theoretically unsinkable.It was equipped with the latest navigation equipment, including two radars. If the ship collided with another ship, its 11 watertight compartments allowed the ship to remain afloat even if the two compartments were completely flooded. His lifeboats were also made so that they could be lowered into the water, even if the ship would have tilted as much as 15 degrees.

On July 25, 1956, Andrea Doria collided with Stockholm, a much smaller ship compared to him. Stockholm damaged Andrea Doria’s hull, as well as its fuel tank, and tore up several watertight compartments. The water began to fill almost empty fuel tanks, with the result that the ship was on the verge of crushing. The ship tilted at 20 degrees, which meant that the lifeboats on board could not be used. The unfortunate internal construction allowed water from the internal compartments to enter other compartments, which only worsened the situation.

However, almost all the people aboard Andrea Doria survived thanks to several ships, including the Stockholm and, in particular, the Ильle-de-France, who helped with their own lifeboats.Captain Andrea Doria Calame refused to leave the ship until the last man was saved. He believed that the ship could have been rescued and towed back to port. He ordered the last member of the crew to leave the ship without him, but they refused to do this until he finally agreed to leave with them. Of the 1,706 passengers of Andrea Doria, only 46 died, and most died as a result of the initial collision. There were five dead in Stockholm — all were crew members. If Andrea Doria sank immediately after the collision, then this tragedy could be comparable to the Titanic.

Saffron Revolution9

After the government abolished fuel subsidies on August 15, 2007, the Saffron Revolution broke out in Burma. This government decision has led to an increase in the cost of gasoline and diesel fuel by 66 percent, and natural gas by 500 percent. Also, there was a sharp increase in the cost of food and transport. Protests began, and about 15,000 monks marched through the streets, calling for the removal of the government, which for the most part consisted of the military. On September 26, 2007, the military junta began the violent suppression of all protests, during which churches were ravaged and monks were arrested.

And the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 was received by Andris Latif from Reuters Agency for a photo of the mortally wounded Japanese videographer Kenji Nagai, who was shot during military speeches. Kenji was covering protests in Rangoon when government forces suddenly opened fire on the crowd. The photo was taken when Kenji was injured and lay with his back on the ground. Even after the shot, Kenji was still recording the events. In the next photo, he was already dead, and the camera was lying on the side. A video of the incident later revealed that Kenji actually pushed the soldiers to the ground, and then shot them from close range. Although initially officials claimed that he was shot by a stray bullet.

Screaming girl10

Afghanistan-born Masud Hossaini won the Pulitzer Prize in 2012. The photograph shows a 12-year-old Afghan girl, Tarana Akbari, who screamed immediately after the suicide bombing, which killed more than 70 people, including seven members of her family. Her family, along with others, went to Kabul to attend the Ashura festival, one of the holiest days of Shiite Muslims.The festival is intended to commemorate the assassination of Imam Ali, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad.

During the celebration at the temple of Abul Fazl, many people gathered, and this was used by a suicide bomber to explode the explosives that were in the backpack. Masood was at the scene at the time of the explosion and was injured in an explosion that was later criticized even by the Taliban. Masood took photos during the annual Ashura festival for 10 years and did not expect anything unusual. It helped Masud's photographs to stand out, that, unlike other photographs that were usually taken after the main event, it was taken immediately during the event; as Masood was present there.

Fireman and little girl11

In 1989, Ron Olshnanger, a furniture merchant who was not even a professional photographer, won the Pulitzer Prize in the News Photography nomination. His photograph depicted Adam Long, a firefighter from the St. Louis Fire Department, who artificially breathed mouth-to-mouth two-year-old Patricia Pettas, whom he had saved from a fire.

Ron had a police scanner, and he liked to photograph the fires.He arrived at the scene a few minutes before Adam brought Patricia out of the burning building. She was unconscious. Ron's photo was bought for $ 200 by the newspaper “St. Louis Post-Dispatch ", where they were placed on the first page. Long was awarded the Medal of Honor, and Ron won the Pulitzer Prize. He gave the money to his mother and sister Patricia.

But the story has an unhappy end, because Patricia died due to complications six days after the fire.

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  • Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize

    Incredible photos that won the Pulitzer Prize